It has happened here

 

List of Journalists Arrested at the RNC

Posted on September 10.2008 by Josh Stearns

During and before the Republican National Convention police in St. Paul arrested numerous journalists, including Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman and her staff, members of a number of independent video groups, an AP photographer and staff from local broadcast stations and newspapers around St. Paul.

Arresting and detaining journalists for doing their jobs is a gross violation of free speech and freedom of the press. Journalists must be free to do their jobs without intimidation. On September 5th, local citizens delivered more than 60,000 letters to St. Paul City Hall calling on Mayor Chris Coleman and local law enforcement officials to drop all charges against journalists arrested while covering protests outside the Republican National Convention.

Below we have begun collecting names of journalists who were charged and links to news reports about their arrests. This is a growing list. If you have information about a journalist who is not listed here please email Josh Stearns at jstearns@freepress.net.

Name Outlet Arrested Charge
Sharif Abdel Kouddous Democracy Now! Sept 1 and Sept 4 Suspicion of felony riot and unlawful assembly
Nicole Salazar Democracy Now! Sept 1 Suspicion of felony riot
Amy Goodman Democracy Now! Sept 1 Obstruction of a legal process and interference with a peace officer.
Matt Rourke Associated Press Sept 1 Gross misdemeanor riot charge
Edward Matthews Univ. of Kentucky (journalism student) Sept 1 Riot charge
Britney McIntosh Univ. of Kentuky (journalism student) Sept 1 Riot charge
Jim Winn Univ. of Kentuky (journalism advisor) Sept 1 Riot charge
Lambert Rochfort PepperSpray Productions Sept 3 Held without charge
Joe LaSac PepperSpray Productions Sept 3 Held without charge
Stephen Maturen Minnesota Daily Sept 4 Peppersprayed and ziptied – only held momentarily.
Jonathan Malat KARE 11 Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Tom Aviles WCCO Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Amy Forliti Associated Press Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Jon Krawczynski Associated Press Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Dean Treftz U-Wire (national college wire service) Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Jeff Schorfheide Badger-Herald Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Matt Snyders University of Iowa / former reporter for Daily Iowan Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Christopher Patton Daily Iowan Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Rick Rowley Big Noise Films Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Jon Wise MyFox Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Alice Kathloff MyFox Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Art Hughes Public News Service Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Jerry Snook Westwood One Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Ben Garvin St. Paul Pioneer Press Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Jason Nicholas New York Post Sept 1 Unlawful assembly and obstructing the legal process
Wendy Binion Portland IndyMedia Sept 2 Felony conspiracy to riot
Geraldine Cahill The Real News Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Ania Smolenskaia The Real News Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Suzanne Hughes The Uptake Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Ted Johnson Variety Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Alice Kalthoff MyFoxdfw.com Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
John P Wise MyFox Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Eileen Clancy I-Witness Video August 26 Unknown
Anita Braithwaite Glass Bead Video Collective August 26 Unknown
Olivia Katz Glass Bead Video Collective August 26 Unknown
Nick Brooks Downtown Express Sept 4 Unlawful assembly and interfering with legal process
Sam Stoker Association of Alternative Newsweeklies Sept 4 Unlawful assembly
Paul Demko Minnesota Independent ? Unknown
Emily Forman I-Witness video group ? Unknown
Malisa Jahn I-Witness video group ? Unknown
Elizabeth Press Democracy Now! ? Unknown
Sheila Regan Twin Cities Daily Planet ? Unknown
Seth Rowe Sun Newspapers ? Unknown
Mark Skinner University of Nevada Las Vegas Rebel Yell reporter ? Unknown
Vlad Teichberg Glass Bead Video Collective ? Unknown
Nathan Weber Chicago Freelance Photographer ? Unknown
Tony Webster Twin Cities Independent Media ? Unknown
Alex Lilly Portland Indymedia ? Unknown
Charlie B MTV Think blogger ? Unknown
Andy Birkey Minnesota Independent ? Unknown
Matt Nelson University of Iowa Photojournalism student ? Unknown
Mark Ovaska Rochester freelance photographer ? Unknown
Chad Davis Freelance Photographer ? Unknown
Dawn Zuppelli Rochester IndyMedia ? Unknown
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From your mouth to God’s ear

The Wrong Energy Agenda

Conservatives should rethink their solution to our energy problems. Instead of more drilling, it’s time for small-scale enterprises, argues guest columnist Byron Kennard

In response to the nation’s energy problems, Republican politicians are calling for extensive and rapid deployment of large-scale technological solutions: drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge; offshore oil development; construction of scores of new coal-fired and nuclear power plants; and development of clean coal technologies (coal-burning power stations equipped with carbon capture and sequestration gizmos).

To meet the rhetorical standards of an American Presidential campaign, this large-scale technology agenda has been distilled into a single mantra: “Drill more, drill now.” (Does this sound to anyone else like the business plan for a dentist?)

Large-scale technologies are, by definition, centralized. What’s more, their social and economic effects are centralizing. Deploying more large-scale technologies means we will become even more dependent on remote energy sources. Why do conservatives, who are philosophically committed to decentralized, small-scale approaches, opt for just the opposite when it comes to energy technology?

It’s not as if there were no small-scale technological solutions already available. There are plenty, indeed, starting with dramatic increases in conservation and efficiency, both of which can pay off hugely simply because Americans are such big—and needless—wasters of energy. This calls for thrift and prudence, both old-time virtues by any standard. Plus, increased conservation and efficiency will save consumers and businesses tons of money, which ought to please conservatives.

Small-Source Energy

On top of this, hundreds of new clean and renewable-energy technologies are flooding the market, most of them small-scale. These make possible the “distributed generation” of energy; that is energy generated from small sources on-site—solar, wind, fuel cells—and used nearby, maybe even in the same building. How much more decentralized can you get?

These small-scale technologies are not being produced by tree-hugging, anti-growth fanatics, or big government regulatory zealots, or closet socialists. They are coming from entrepreneurial small businesses whose owners are every bit as likely to be Republicans as Democrats.

Republicans profess to love entrepreneurship. But entrepreneurship has much more to do with small scale enterprise than large. Big businesses are seldom entrepreneurial, and entrepreneurs are seldom found in big businesses. We can afford to fail on the small scale but not on the big scale.

The Entrepreneurial Edge

This has been true throughout history. Tinkerers working in garages created the Industrial Age, remember? Their modern day counterparts, working on computers, are creating the post-Industrial Age. In this new era, little businesses are running rings around big businesses. Entrepreneurial small firms actually produce five times as many patents per dollar as large companies and 20 times as many as universities, according to the National Small Business Association, a trade group.

Contemplating this, one would think that entrepreneur-loving conservative politicians would be in seventh heaven. But don’t look for them there. Where you’ll find them is in bed with big business, cozily scheming to maintain the status quo.

Big businesses are exceptionally fond of the status quo, and not just because of the manifold subsidies they enjoy. Another reason is they don’t know how to get their hands on all these emerging small-scale technologies. These innovations are so numerous, so varied, and evolving so rapidly that no one can stay on top of them.

Innovative Speed

Indeed, the quickening pace of innovation puts big systems more and more at a disadvantage. No matter how quickly and how often big systems retool, something better comes along even before they finish.

Since big businesses don’t yet know how to control these small-scale technologies, or—most important—how to make money off them, they are content to pat them on the head, comment on how cute they are, and observe that in 20 or 30 years, when they grow up, such technologies might indeed be an option.